Category Archives: Landscape Photography

A blog about my work as a landscape photographer

A Molten Morar Morning

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A pause from early morning work to enjoy a second cup of coffee and savour the lightening sky emerging over Morar.  For an all to brief a moment the thin cloud took on the form of those fluid basaltic flows where the sheets of fiery molten lava spread out and then cool to leave their mosaic of ripples and swirls in the volcanic rock.

Sunbeams by Rhum

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A testing week in more ways than one as computer problems caused a significant revision to the week’s work.  A couple of days of rain storms gave way today to another great day, for so late in Autumn.  As the evening darkened so the clouds began to roll in from the West with the sun fighting it’s corner to ensure that every now and again those jewels, that are the evening sunbeams, provided some stunning illumination against the swirling mass of black and granite grey cumulus cloud.

The Power of Light – Peace and Tranquility

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It was going to be an evening in front of the computer meeting the dreaded deadlines.  However a power cut put paid to that and since I have still yet to buy the generator I keep promising myself there was nothing else to do than pour a glass of wine, open the patio doors and spend and hour simply watching the sun go down as a very calm Sound of Sleat provided a reassuring sound track, gently lapping the rocks below.  The last week in October and still in short sleeves!  To the left, and out of shot a number of day boats were busy making the most of the weather and the fish must be about as earlier, with a mug of coffee, I had watched a pod of 15 dolphins cruise through the Sound, the second time in 4 days.  With the clear skies and lack of light pollution it looks like there will be good chance of the milky way being clearly viewable again tonight as it was yesterday evening.  Let’s hope the power is not put back on too soon!?

Tell me why?…….

It was Bob Geldof who first asked the question about Monday mornings.  A very peaceful and colourful start to the day (and week) for some walking on very little foreshore, due to high tides, at Armadale bay.  Looking across to Knoydart was a real treat as the sky lightened from the East with some vivid colours produced from the morning sun.  One the way back for a cup of coffee the radio reported the first frosts on the East coast yet my walk had been made in short sleeves!  However with the winds becoming more frequent I do not think there are many more of shirt sleeved mornings left in 2016!

It was Bob Geldof who first asked the question about Monday mornings. A very peaceful and colourful start to the day (and week for some) walking on very little foreshore, due to high tides, at Armadale bay. Looking across to Knoydart was a real treat as the sky lightened from the East with some vivid colours produced from the morning sun. One the way back for a cup of coffee, the radio reported the first frosts on the East coast yet my walk had been made in short sleeves! However with the winds becoming more frequent I do not think there are many more shirt sleeved mornings left in 2016!  Click on image for larger version

Hyacinthoides non-scripta

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Aird in Bloom! It has been an excellent year for the bluebells across Sleat. Normally their impact is hidden as they grow amongst the bracken or within more wooded areas but on this croft where the bracken has only recently been cleared their dense covering provides a vivid carpet of colour on the hillside.

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A New Dawn?

A small tribute from Alligin Photography to the Royal Navy Rugby Union. As so often it is the Reds that first catch the eye, but gradually as you look over time it is the Blues in this image of a dawn from my home in Skye that take the ascendancy, gradually controlling the attention as surely as the tide coming in. A long day yesterday working with a great group of photographers. Hopefully managed to keep the outputs professional for both sides but naturally pleased to see my former Service take the honours.

A small tribute from Alligin Photography to the Royal Navy Rugby Union. As so often is the case,  it is the Reds that first catch the eye, but gradually as you look over time it is the Blues in this image of a dawn from my home in Skye that take the ascendancy, gradually controlling the attention as surely as the tide coming in. A long day yesterday working with a great group of photographers. Hopefully managed to keep the outputs professional for both sides but naturally pleased to see my former Service take the honours of the Inter Service Title.

 

A selection of action images from the photography team at yesterday’s Army Navy Match can be found by clicking here.

What’s in a name?

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Abigail, Barney, Clodagh, Desmond, Eva, Frank, Gertrude, Henry, Imogen, Jake, and Katie’s next (according to the list).  From 10 November 2015 through to the 2 March 2016 the Met Office named 10 storms.  The naming was to help the “public be better placed to keep themselves, their property and business safe”.  It certainly prompted some debate especially for those in the Outer Isles, Orkney and Shetland that hardly noticed any abatement in the wind between Gertrude on 28 Jan and Imogen on the 8 Feb.  The Met in many ways are to be applauded because it certainly brought a focus to the British obsession with the weather but, like the News at 10, it necessarily focuses on the bad aspects (although there is a certain beauty in a storm), of damage and distress.

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So perhaps we should start naming the highs, and the 1039  just off Shetland is certainly producing some tranquil weather over Sleat in the South East of Skye.  Barely a ripple on the Sound; Eigg, Rhum and the headland sharply silhouetted as the sun fades and the first daffodil opened in the garden.  Time to sit back and enjoy the vista with a glass of red (purely to match the mood of course).

Can Man Ever Match Nature’s Majesty?

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Looking from Kyle towards Skye, the concrete bridge across Loch Alsh has an elegance about it that does not detract from Skye’s mountains beyond.  For me better a bridge in front then a turbine on a ridge line but that remains a separate debate.

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For the Fallen

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“At the going down of the sun and in the morning;”

The line from Binyon’s 1914 poem must be one of the most remembered and repeated line of verse.  He wrote his poem whilst on the North Cornish coast, near Polzeath, looking out to sea.  Though written for the fallen servicemen and women serving across the channel in the first World War it serves now a far wider remit.  My professional work takes in both rugby and photography.  Having spent the whole day reviewing action from the second round of the 2015/16 European Champions and Challenge cups, the tricolour arm bands worn in memory of the Paris victims were particularly poignant.  With rugby sharing many of the same values as Service life it brought forward another line from the same poem:

“They mingle not with their laughing comrades again;”

But perhaps in these troubled times, with the particular horrors of modern conflict, the most apt line is the one that follows and is applicable to anyone, from which ever corner of the world they originate who has to endure the news that a dear one will not be returning home that night:

“They sit no more at familiar tables of home;”

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Two views of Eigg from my office on the Isle of Skye. A tranquil scene in what is at times a very troubled world.

 

August Inversion – A Tough Day Ahead!!

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Up before the alarm this morning and greeted with sea mist on the Sound of Sleat

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